Tuesday, December 17, 2019

Windy


December 17, 2019—Not even the sunny, warm skies of south Florida are immune to cold fronts. One is moving in today, and with it has come a lot of wind and slightly dropping temperatures. Tomorrow the high will only be around 71, as compared to about 80ish today and yesterday.

Early this afternoon, we did some exploring and found the Venice fishing pier, as well as Caspersen Beach in south Venice. The wind, however, was problematic. The normally calm gulf created crashing waves that were not conducive to fishing. At Caspersen Beach, we thought we saw people looking for sand fleas (a crustacean) for beach fishing, but we discovered was they were looking for shark teeth! Apparently that beach is known for the teeth.
Our campsite at Oscar Scherer State Park near Venice, Fla.

It was much too windy to fish on the pier (maybe tomorrow), so we high-tailed it back to the creek at Blackburn Point where we fished yesterday. We had few real bites. I finally caught a toadfish, which we threw back. (Toadfish can be toxic if not cleaned properly, but we have eaten it before. It’s all in knowing how to clean the little beastie to make it safe to eat.) Because the fish swallowed the hook and we could not disengage it, we had to cut the hook off. Hopefully the little guy survived.

As the clouds continued to come in and the temperature dropped a bit, we called it quits for the afternoon.

Around 5 p.m., we decided to try fishing the fresh-water lake, using lures. It took Jim about 10 minutes to tie on a lure. (His fingers didn’t want to cooperate tying the tiny knots.) Finally, he took the pole and cast out into the still water. A few minutes later, as I was reeling in my own lure, he stood next to me. Why wasn’t he fishing? On his first cast, he caught a tree; the tree won.

Our “fish dinner” tonight consisted of delicious homemade spaghetti sauce, noodles, green beans, and salad. It was excellent.

Until next time,

Your Reluctant RoVer,

Linda

Monday, December 16, 2019

On the 'left coast'


December 16, 2019—Last week I was in Palatine, Ill., enjoying the company of my daughter, son-in-law, and their teenaged children, and suffering whenever I went outside: When I left, it was around 20 degrees, and there had been snow flurries in the morning. I returned to Jacksonville to somewhat chilly weather (60s, but raw). After a few days at home, we loaded the camper and we are now in south Florida, on Florida's west coast, also known as the "left coast." 

The sun is warm; the sky is clear--sorry friends who are in the Midwest and are shoveling out of a heavy snow storm! 

We are camping at Oscar Scherer State Park, located in Osprey, which is next door to Venice, Fla. This state park is like an oasis in the suburbs. You can actually see a subdivision abutting it as you drive down the roadway! It is a nice park, although it does not have the fishing we thought it would. There is a creek that runs down its length, and there is also a closed-system fresh-water lake, which theoretically has fish. (We haven’t tried fishing in these two bodies of water yet.) The park offers a myriad of activities, from guided hikes to folk-music concerts.
The news today said that the Midwest was in the middle of a snow storm. The white in this picture is now snow; it is sand on a beach on the Gulf of Mexico in Venice, Fla. Highs were in the 80s, with low humidity and cloudless skies. 

Although the park doesn’t seem to have a lot of fishing onsite, it is located near the gulf and the intracoastal.

Before taking our poles out of the truck, we drove around to explore possible fishing sites. One of those was a jetty. Several anglers were trying their luck, but we didn’t see anyone catch anything except a hardhead catfish. Next to the jetties were some nice beaches. And yes, the sun was warm (around 80 degrees). I don’t know how warm the water was, but a lot of snow-birds were trying to get rid of their winter whites.

We stopped at a local bait shop and learned about a few places to drop our lines. We tried one spot, on a creek that goes out to the gulf. I caught a slightly undersized mangrove snapper; Jim only caught a tiny little pin fish. It didn’t matter; we had fun.

Tonight the park is offering another folk concert around a campfire. We intend to take it in.

We’ll be here until Friday morning, when we will go back home and prepare for a visit from my Chicago family.

Until next time,

Your Reluctant RoVer,

Linda

Wednesday, November 6, 2019

Our catch of the day


November 6, 2019—Fishing is fun, even if you don’t catch anything. That’s a good thing, because on this trip, we fed a lot of fish, but we couldn’t lure any onto our hooks. We hooked two or three tiny fingerlings, but the big ones were evasive. Our freezer is empty.

We aren’t going home entirely empty-handed, however. We “caught” some delicious chocolate at the candy factory in Daytona Beach, which is less than 10 miles from our campground. The fudges and the chocolate-covered bacon are not as nutritious as fish, but we will savor their taste nonetheless. Everyone deserves some a good chocolate treat every once in a while.
Our catch of the day was chocolate, purchased from Angell & Phelps Chocolate Factory in Daytona Beach. Chew praline, rocky road, and chocolate caramel fudge, plus chocolate-covered bacon. Who needs fish when you can catch chocolate?

On another subject…

We continue to “shake down” our new truck camper. Like any new vehicle, we have found several things that need to be corrected. What has proved disappointing, however, is the dealer prep from Ocean Grove RV, where we purchased our truck camper. Just like when you buy a car, we had to pay a dealer-prep charge for the camper. We found that essentially nothing had been checked; we did not even get all the manuals for all appliances, such as the TV/radio/dvd sets. The TV and radio/dvd are supposed to be connected via HTMI, and share the six built-in speakers in the camper.

When we made our maiden voyage two weeks ago, we discovered that the sound on the TV was not loud enough. With the air conditioner on, we could barely hear the news. Because we had no instructions, I downloaded the manual for the Jensen devices. We followed directions, but still no good sound and no TV sound out of the speakers. I emailed the company; they suggested calling when we were in the camper.

Jim called today. After talking with the technician, he discovered that an HDMI cord had not been plugged into the radio/dvd appliance. This should have been done at the factory. Since it wasn’t, it should have been discovered and corrected during the dealer prep. It is fixed now, thanks to my husband, not Lance or Ocean Grove.

Despite small annoyances, we are enjoying our experience immensely in our new truck camper.

Tomorrow we return home. Our next camping trip, which will be to a state park on the west coast of Florida, is scheduled for Dec. 15.

Until then,

Your Reluctant RoVer,

Linda

Tuesday, November 5, 2019

Not crabby about the weather


November 5, 2019—Cloudy, overcast, rainy skies. We are at Tomoka State Park, 60 miles from Jacksonville, south of St. Augustine, just outside the town of Ormond Beach. This is our second visit to Tomoka; we were here last year when it was cold, really cold. So we welcome the overcast skies with temperatures in the 70s.
We like this state park. The roads are sand, but they are smooth and well marked. The wash houses are large and very clean. The sites are private and not too close together. It has several spots on the shore of the Halifax River from which you can fish. And the state park has wifi! That in itself makes it a "keeper."
We dropped our lines at one of Ormand Beach’s public fishing piers on the Halifax River. It is a large pier that makes a complete circuit back to a nice, clean public restroom, and it offers a place to take a leisurely walk or a jog or (of course) to fish. This particular pier is built under a bridge, a natural place to fish. Many species lurk in the tannic water to seek out crustaceans that adhere to the bridge pilings.

Jim is talking to another angler who is fishing off one leg of the pier.




I'm guessing that the total span of this pier is at least a quarter mile. The far leg was under construction when we were here last year. 

Jacksonville has seven—count them, seven—bridges that span its rivers. How many fishing piers does it have like this one? Zero. Nada. Nil. None. If you want to fish under a bridge, you have to risk climbing rocks.
Jacksonville has the largest park system in the country. Many of these parks are on or near water. How many fishing piers does it have? You can count on one hand.
If a small town can have a great fishing pier, why can’t the biggest geographic city in the United States? Because Jacksonville’s government is cheap.
Okay. I’ll get off my soapbox now.
Last year when we came here to fish, it was very cold, but the fish were not biting. This time, they were biting—enjoying our bait—but we weren’t catching. I fed a lot of shrimp to hungry fish, probably catfish. I caught the tiniest catfish I’ve ever seen—about three inches long! Later I caught another species that was just too small to keep. Jim didn’t have any better luck, except he pulled in a surprise: a crab!
Although we have a crab trap, we haven’t used it recently. This crab latched onto Jim’s bait and didn’t let go when he hauled in the line. We kept it; it will be part of our dinner tonight, despite the fact that the crab only has one claw.

Poor little guy only has one claw. Nevertheless, he will supplement our differ tonight.
What’s on our agenda for tomorrow? Perhaps some surf fishing. We also may go down to Daytona Beach (about 30 minutes away) to visit a candy factory, which we toured last year. Some of the factory’s specialties include chocolate-covered bacon and chocolate-covered potato chips. Yum.
Fish in our freezer or not, we are having a great time on this short vacation.
Until later,
Your Reluctant RoVer,
Linda

Wednesday, October 23, 2019

Shark feast!


October 23, 2019—We returned home today from a great three-day shake-down “cruise” at Little Talbot Island State Park. Our dinner? The shark fillets I had soaking in milk overnight.

A milk marinade takes away any fishy taste and smell, and is especially necessary with shark. We learned that shark must be killed and bled immediately after being caught, to avoid tainting the meat with uremic acid. (Sharks urinate through their skin.) Jim did this on the beach and cleaned the fillets when we got back to the campground. I put them in a milk bath, where they stayed until I was ready to cook them.

How to cook shark? Google answered that. I found several recipes, which served as a basis for our evening meal.

I took one shark fillet and cut it into small one-inch chunks. After arranging the chunks on a plate, I placed a small pat of butter on each, sprinkled them with a creole seasoning, and topped them with shredded parmesan cheese. To cook them, I popped them into the microwave and zapped them for about 90 seconds. They came our juicy, tender, and delicious!

The second fillet I decided to coat in fine gluten-free panko crumbs, mixed with parmesan and the same creole seasoning. I then pan-fried the fillet.

The verdict? Succulent. The meat was tender, juicy, and not at all fishy tasting. In fact, if I were to serve it to someone without telling them what it was, they wouldn’t even know it was fish!
We have caught several sharks when we have gone surf fishing. Some species are protected, but many are not. In the future, we will keep whatever we can.

Until next time (which should be the week of November 4),

Your Reluctant RoVer,

Linda

Tuesday, October 22, 2019

Rain, fishing, and shark


October 22, 2019, Little Talbot Island—Rain, rain, go away.
Actually, we are happy to have rain; we have been in a flash draught. However…does it have to rain when we are on vacation?

(Yes, retirees—at least Jim and I—go on vacation. We need to do so; too many things needing attention at home never seem to leave us time to go fishing!)

We went down to Simpson’s Creek (a couple miles from this state park) yesterday. Not even a nibble. We came home and tried the fishing pier. Again, nothing. About 4 p.m., when the tide was receding, I decided to go back to the pier again. Tide change is the time to fish.

As I was standing on the fishing pier, I could see feeding activity in the far-off weeds, a sure sign of big fish, probably reds or trout. Given some time and a bit of luck, I was hoping to catch at least one of them. It was not meant to be. Just as Jim was to join me, he looked to the west and saw the encroaching rain clouds. About 10 minutes later, it started to rain. That put an end to my fishing; I am a fair-weather angler.

The fish are out there. Our camping neighbors went out in their kayaks and pulled in 21 trout. Having a water vehicle, of course, helps in fishing: You go where the fish are. As landlubbers, we have to wait for them to come to us.

Today, we decided to go surf fishing or fish near the inlet (where the neighbors caught the trout). We discovered that we forgot to bring our pole holders (pvc pipe with a contoured lip, which are stuck in the sand). Surf fishing is a lot easier when you have those holders, otherwise, you have to sit and hold the pole. (You are also obviously limited on how many poles you can fish at a time.)

I caught two ladyfish and a catfish. Jim finally caught a catfish and…(ta-ta!) a bonnethead shark, about two feet long. We decided to toss the ladyfish and catfish back, although they (like any other fish) are edible. The bonnethead is a different story.

We did not take a photo of the bonnethead shark Jim caught during this vacation. However, he caught one last year at New Smyrna Beach in Central Florida could be a twin to the one he caught today. Had we known how tasty shark is we would have kept this one! 

Bonnetheads are legal to keep. A new regulation in Florida requires anglers who intend to fish for shark to take an online course. Although we don’t intend to fish for shark, we took the course and learned which sharks are legal to keep and which are protected. We also learned through videos that shark is good to eat, provided it is cleaned correctly. That starts with dispatching it and bleeding it out immediately. Sharks urinate through their skin; bleeding them out helps avoid tainting the meat with uric acid from the urine.

Jim filleted the bonnet head, and I have it soaking in milk (also recommended). I don’t have all the ingredients I would like to use to cook it tonight, so the shark will be our dinner tomorrow evening, when we are at home. I’ll post if it was good eating—or not.

Until later,

Your Reluctant RoVer,

Linda

P.S. The reason why you are seeing these posts after the dateline is because we have only sporadic LTE. When I say sporadic, I mean 10 seconds or so at a time, a few times a week. State parks should put up wifi towers. Today’s campers need them. At least we have good TV coverage, all Jacksonville channels. Yes, although we are about 30 miles from our home, we are still in the city, which reportedly is the largest (geographically speaking) city in the continental in the United States.

Monday, October 21, 2019

Shake-down 'cruise'


October 21, 2019—We are at Little Talbot Island State Park, about 30 miles north of home. We arrived last night, and we slept well, our first night in our new truck camper.

Although we purchased the camper last month, this is the first opportunity we have had for a “shake-down” cruise. The reason? On the way home from picking up the camper, we had a small accident. The door to the microwave, set in a lower cabinet under the stove (not overhead as microwaves generally are placed) shattered. The drawer under banquette, opposite (but on the same level as) the microwave/convection oven was not latched. It swung out and broke the door. Poor design, and the manufacturer did not have a warning to latch all doors before driving.

This camper has a side door.


The accident was covered under the warranty, but we had to wait for the part. (I think they installed a new appliance.)

The new camper is slowly becoming our second home: Jim put up a magnetic knife holder over the sink. Very handy, especially since kitchen-cabinet drawer space is limited. He also built and installed a paper-towel holder. (Why don’t they come installed?)
The magnetic knife holder frees up drawer space, which is sparse.

Jim made this paper towel holder, which matches the cabinetry almost perfectly.

The camper came with a spice rack and magazine racks under the TV (who takes magazines camping?). It also has another magazine rack near the couch. Jim installed a power strip with high-speed USB ports on the side of the rack, which is the ideal size to hold my laptop when not in use. When we get home he will install another small spice rack (which was by the sink) on the back of the banquette near the power strip, to hold our phones and tablets while they are charging. (FYI: This camper comes with several USB outlets, but I suspect they are only 1 amp, not 2.4, which is needed to charge tablets and fast-charge phones.)
This magazine rack is the ideal size to hold my laptop. Jim installed the outlet strip, which has USB plugs.  
We also purchased an ice maker, a real godsend. We had one several years ago in our first RV, but it died over time. This one has a smaller footprint and works pretty fast. Sure beats filling ice trays several times a day, especially since we need ice when we go fishing.

Although the refrigerator (6 cubic feet) is the same size that we had in the old truck camper (and I think, also, in our very first RV, back in 2010), its design is much improved, with a capacity to hold more food.

The new camper also has a good-sized bathroom. Still a bit crowded, but it has a full counter top and more storage than in the other camper. The camper also has larger water and sewer (grey and black) tanks than the other camper. We don’t have sewer hookup here at Little Talbot Island, so we are taking showers at the wash house (very nice). If our tanks are not full Tuesday night (our last night here), we will try our own shower.

The nicest thing in this camper (and the reason why we bought it) is the couch. It is a jack-knife couch (turns into a sleeper), and as such is not the most comfortable to sit on. However…it has two built-in footrests. With a small pillow behind your back, you can sit back, stretch out, and relax. We had no place to do that in either our last truck camper or in our last “big” RV, Thor (27-footer). Thor had a couch, but we could not stretch out well, and the couch was uncomfortable. (It was also a jack-knife sleeper.) The footrest also allows me to use the laptop as a laptop!
We can stretch out on the couch and relax, reading or watching TV.
This camper doesn’t have quite as much storage for clothing as the other did, but I think it will be adequate. Outside, it has plenty of storage.

Last night, we met our camping neighbors, who have a small teardrop type of travel trailer. We invited them in to see the truck camper. They were in awe of all the space we have. We are too.

Until next time,

Your Reluctant RoVer,

Linda